Date: March 21, 2015

Interview with Hyphen Magazine

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I ended up pretty happy with what I said in this interview with Hyphen Magazine about my fiction. I think much of it has to do with the fact that Karissa Chen is a good friend of mine, and she got out of me very candid truths.

Also, Margaret Cho started following me after reading this interview. If you read what I say, you’ll know why.

…My own parents transferred their wartime PTSD onto me—for better and for worse. For better, because in an Apocalypse, I will probably get a posse together in ten seconds and survive. For worse, because I keep thinking about the Apocalypse. I mean, when I see a tree and a wild turkey, I think “Wow, that’s nice. Nature.” And then immediately, I see a source for lumber and food. In that sense, my innocence is gone.

And in the case of my parents’ PTSD, I have no visual for what it is that haunts me. It’s my parents’ ghost, and it’s never been given a face.

I certainly think these ghosts are why I write—to give the ghosts and monsters faces in stories.

What If Reality Suddenly Fell Apart?

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A few months ago, right after my BuzzFeed stroke essay went live, I had the opportunity to talk about my stroke recovery and ensuing life changes, with Whit Missildine. We sat in my living room, and he asked me questions, and told me to speak freely about all the things that had happened, and what I felt, and how the stroke changed my perception. Also, I was very aware of my voice. And the many times I say “like” while speaking.

This week, the podcast went live on Whit’s AMAZING podcast series called “This is Actually Happening,” consisting of “first-person stories that explore what happens when everything changes.” Each podcast episode is entitled with a “What If…?” scenario.

The podcast episode on which my story is featured is called “What If Reality Suddenly Fell Apart?”

Take a listen.